Horticulture Tips for January

There are a few landscape tasks that can be undertaken doing the winter when the weather allows. Read More...

Drought Alert

With no signs of appreciate moisture in the long term forecast, now would be a good time to consider dragging out the water hoses if you have a landscape that is susceptible to drought or winter cold injury. Read More...

Visit The Botanic Garden at OSU this Winter

The Botanic Garden at OSU is no secret to most of the readers in this column. However, just in case you might be new to the area or simply haven’t been to the garden yet, here are a few highlights of one of Payne County’s best features. Read More...

Are My Saved Seeds Still Good?

If receiving the first seed catalogs of the season excites you, chances are pretty good that you may have a collection of old seed around your house. If that is the case, now is a great time to run a simple germination test to see if those old seeds are still viable, or if they need to be discarded.
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Horticulture Tips for December

Taking care of the following landscape tasks can help protect your landscape from severe temperature fluctuations like that could happen just about any day now. Read More...

Poinsettia Care

With proper care, not only can your poinsettia provide beautiful color through the winter, it can also make a statement in your outdoor garden next summer. Read More...

Ash Tree Decline

Ash trees in the eastern United States are being devastated (i.e. virtually wiped out) by the Emerald Ash borer (EAB). The EAB was introduced to this country in the Detroit area in the 1990’s and has spread rapidly over the last 20 years. Read More...

New Master Gardener Class Forming Soon

The Payne County Extension office is making final preparations to offer our next round of Master Gardener Training. Read More...

Garden Dates for Next Season

With last week’s hard freeze, we can officially put the garden season of 2017 to rest. With the chores mostly completed, now is a good time to begin looking forward to next year. A great way to do that is by noting some key dates on the calendar. Read More...

Horticulture Tips for November

Consider the following landscape maintenance activities as we transition into November: Read More...

Using Fireplace Ashes in the Landscape

Should ashes be used as a fertilizer/soil conditioner in the lawn and garden and if so, how much should be used? Read More...

New Tree Care

Once the investment of a new tree is made, it is critical to follow a few steps to help insure its long term success. These are not difficult tasks, but based on years of observations, they are steps that appear to be often neglected. Read More...

Unsightly Mounds in the Lawn

Concerned about small mounds of soil appearing in your lawn? The typical concern is multiple mounds two to four inches in diameter, sometimes with a hole in the center but sometimes without. There are a couple of insects that can create this type of symptom. Read More...

Horticulture Tips for October

Consider the following landscape/garden tasks as we transition into fall: Read More...

Fall Garden Events

Payne County has two outstanding gardening events coming up soon. While we were already excited for them, the recent stretch of cool nights should really give ornamental plants a boost and the gardens should really begin to sparkle. Read More...

Uncommon Trees for Fall Color

Consider the following choices if you are looking for a plant to make a dramatic statement in the fall landscape. Read More...

Rose Rosette Disease Update

Based on feedback from our Master Gardeners at last week’s Payne County Fair, Rose Rosette disease is the most common pest problem facing gardeners in our area. We’ve talked about Rose Rosette several times in this column, but in case you missed it, here’s a brief review. Read More...

Horticulture Tips for September

Consider the following tips for your September landscape. Read More...

Act Now to Prevent Pesky Weeds in the Spring

Even though bluegrass, chickweed, and henbit are often referred to as spring weeds since that is when they become an issue, these are actually classified as “winter annual” weeds. The ideal way to control these weeds is to apply a fall-pre-emergence product now before these weeds germinate. Read More...

Unusual Weather: Expect the Unexpected

In Oklahoma we can usually count on a hot dry August. That has certainly not been the case this year. While the cool, wet month has been a refreshing surprise, there is one down side to this weather; look for an increasing probability for fungal diseases to crop up and attack our favorite plants. Read More...

August Tree Update

An increasing number of calls are coming into the Payne County Extension office about the condition of our area trees. Specifically, clients are seeing lots of browning and early leaf drop. While we can’t say for certain what might be causing a problem with a specific tree, here’s a general summary of what we are seeing and what, if anything, you need to do about it. Read More...

Horticulture Tips for August

Consider the following tips for your August landscape. Read More...

Spider Mites in the Garden

Spider mites typically attack garden plants like tomatoes in very hot, dry weather. These pests are difficult to control under the best of circumstances. To keep spider mites from getting the upper hand, early detection is essential. Read More...

Pecan Nut Weevil and Crop Thinning

One of the biggest pests for pecans is the pecan nut weevil. If you’ve ever been disappointed to find empty nuts on the ground with a small hole pierced in the shell, you know what kind of damage they can cause. Mid to late July is the time of year this pest usually shows up, typically just after a heavy rain. Read More...

Trees and Insects

Regardless of how the webworm population does or does not develop this year, if you’re a regular follower of this column, you may remember that we seldom advise attempting to control these pests. While it’s no question that they are a visual nuisance, it is rare for them to cause long term problems for a tree. Read More...

Horticulture Tips for July

Please consider the following landscape tips as we begin this very wet start to July… Read More...

Rooting Fall Tomatoes

One summer crop that can be renewed easier than you may think is tomatoes. You can produce “clones” of your existing tomato plants that are rooted in time for a fall harvest. They can then be transplanted or left right where they are rooted. This method will save you time, money, and will allow flexibility. Read More...

Plant Selections for Privacy Screens

Last week we talked about some of the factors to consider when choosing plants for screening purposes. Here’s some specific plants that should work well for most of Payne County. Read More...

Privacy Screen Considerations

Payne County residents who find themselves in areas with high levels of new construction activity might be asking themselves, “What can I plant for a fast growing screen”? Before we talk about specific plant suggestions, it is important to talk about some general concepts related to the idea of using plants as a living screen. Read More...

Squash Bug Management

If you are dealing with squash bugs in large numbers, realistically it may be too late to get them under control at this point in the season. And you can count on having squash bugs the next time you plant cucurbits (squash, pumpkin, watermelon, cantaloupe, and cucumber) as well. However, this information should help you be better prepared the next time around. Read More...

Horticulture Tips for June

Keep the following tips in mind for your June landscape. Read More...

Strawberry Care Following Harvest

To increase your chances of a successful strawberry crop next year, begin soon after harvest preparing the plants for next year. Read More...

Troubleshooting Problem Lawns

Some of the most commonly asked questions coming into the Payne County Extension Office involve poor lawn conditions. While each individual circumstance is unique, there are some common factors that can usually help explain the underlying cause of the problem. Read More...

Weed Killer Concerns

An unpleasant side-effect to all the great rains we’ve had recently is the explosion in our weed growth. The calls and damaged plant samples coming into the Extension office right now serve as a somber reminder for the need to take care with weed control products, especially those designed to control broad leaf weeds.
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Vegetable Garden Update

Here are some things to keep an eye on as we work through this cool, wet spell. Read More...

Horticulture Tips for May

Consider the following tips for your May landscape: Read More...

Crapemyrtle Pests

Crapemyrtles are key plants for a colorful summer landscape in our part of the country. Winter die-back certainly doesn’t seem to have been an issue this year, which is not unexpected since we had only two very brief cold snaps last winter. However early indications appear we may see some heavier-than-usual insect activity on these plants this year. Read More...

Looking for the Perfect Plant

One of the most common questions horticulturists hear is “what is the ideal plant for X location?” Alas, if only it were that easy to answer. The short answer is it depends. Read More...

Pecan Grafting Season

Pecans are an important Oklahoma crop. “Improved” pecan trees are produced by grafting a desirable variety on to the rootstock of a native pecan. Our pecan grafting class is Tuesday, April the 28th at 6:30PM at the Payne County Expo Center. Read More...

Horticulture Tips for April

It’s April and everything is turning green! Those interested in all things “home grown” start thinking of getting outside to do their part. Lets go through some common tasks that will need attention this month. Read More...

Tips for Blueberry Success

Here are some tips to give you the greatest opportunity for success with these plants that really don’t care for Oklahoma summers. Read More...

Blackberries for the Home Garden

As garden centers are busy stocking their shelves with new plants, this is a good time to discuss some basic guidelines for a successful berry planting. Read More...

Winter Damage on Evergreens

As hard and fast as spring is coming on, it’s easy to forget we did have two brushes with with near zero temperatures this last winter. Those two events were enough to cause significant leaf browning and/or drop to several of our common evergreens trees and shrubs. Read More...

Horticulture Tips for March

Consider the following Tips for your March landscape. Read More...

Sandbur Control Part 2

No, this is not the right time of year to take action against sandburs. However, we’ve had a rash of calls about this pesky weed recently so I thought it might be helpful to go ahead and talk about it now so you can formulate your action plan for this growing season. Read More...

Sandbur Control Part 1

No, this is not the right time of year to take action against sandburs. However, sandburs are one of the most asked about topics in the Payne County Extension office, so I thought it might be helpful to go ahead and talk about it now so you can formulate your action plan for this growing season. Read More...

Winter Weed Control Tips

If you are new to using weed control products, the discussion can get tedious and a bit confusing. Perhaps a few definitions would be helpful. Read More...

Ice Storm: Landscape Damage Assessment and Repair

Here are some tips that should help your landscape recover with the least possible damage following a winter ice storm. Read More...

Cold and Dry Landscape Update

Payne County is now in the severe drought category. While you don’t hear much about drought in the winter, it is still a very important consideration for all plant material. While plants don’t need as much water now as they do in the summer, an adequate supply is just as important. Read More...
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